Home > R > How do you get things into base-R?

How do you get things into base-R?

A couple of months ago I spotted that the examples for the paste function weren’t very good, and actually, there were quite a few functions that new users of R are likely to encounter, that weren’t well explained.

I’ve now managed to get some updated examples into R (paste, sum, NumericConstants, pie, a couple dozen more functions hopefully to follow), and a few people have asked how I did it.

The important thing to remember is that R is a communist ecosystem: all R users are equal, except those in the ruling R Core Team Party. If you want anything to happen, you need to persuade a member of R Core.

If the change can be made by creating of adding to a package, you’ll probably find it easier to do that. R Core members all have day jobs, and get a lot of crappy requests, so expect your request to be considered very low priority.

Of course, there is a certain amount of psychology involved in this. If R Core have heard of you, then your chances increase a little. Spend some time discussing things on r-devel, upload some packages to CRAN, and say hello to them at useR. (I mostly avoid r-devel in favour Stack Overflow, spend a fair amount of time getting packages rejected from CRAN, but I have said hello to a few of them.)

There are three ways of making your request to R Core:

File a bug report

If you have found a problem that you can reproduce, and can articulate, and seems possible to fix in a reasonable amount of time, then file a bug report.

My success rate with bugs is slightly better than fifty-fifty: 12 out of 22 were closed as fixed, and one more was closed as won’t-fix but was then fixed anyway. This means that you need to be psychologically prepared for rejection: not all your fixes will be made, and you shouldn’t get upset when they don’t.

There are many pitfalls involved in filing a bug report, so if you want to stand any chance of success, then try to follow these guidelines.

– You absolutely must have a reproducible example of the behaviour that you want to change. If you can’t reproduce it, you aren’t ready to submit the bug report.

– Speculation as to the cause of a problem is a cultural no-no. Brian Ripley will tell you off if you do this. Stick to the facts.

– If the problem involves external libraries (the Windows API for example), then your chance of getting a successful change is drastically reduced, and you may want to consider other methods of contacting R Core before you file a bug report.

– The same is true if your proposed change involves changing the signature of a base R function (even if it doesn’t conflict with existing behaviour).

– Make it as easy as you can for a change to be made. Your probability of success decays exponentially with the amount of time it takes for the fix to be made. (This is true of any software project, not just R.)

Start a discussion on the r-devel mailing list

If you can’t consistently reproduce a problem, or if there are several possible behaviours that could be right, or there is some sort of trade-off involved in making a change, then you should ask here first.

Having a discussion on r-devel means that other community members get to discuss the pros and cons of your idea, and allows people to test your idea on other operating systems/versions of R, and with other use cases.

Contact the member of R Core directly

If your problem is fuzzy, and you aren’t finding any luck on r-devel, then you might want to try contacting a member of R Core directly. (I want to emphasise that you should usually try r-devel first, and email is less invasive than a phone call or turning up at their house.)

Most bits of R fall under general R Core maintenance but some specialist packages have a single maintainer, and direct contact is likely to be more successful for these.

For example, for anything related to the grid package, you need to speak to Paul Murrell. For anything related to lattice, you want Deepayan Sarkar. For codetools, you want Luke Tierney. Find out who the maintainers are with:

lapply(dir(R.home("library")), packageDescription)

In the end, you may use several methods of communication: I submitted a bug report about the paste examples, and then had some follow up email with Martin Maechler about updating further examples.

In terms of time-scales, I’ve had a few bugs fixed the same day, but in general expect things to take weeks to months, especially for bigger changes.

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  1. 20th January, 2015 at 20:21 pm

    Thanks Richie. Fixing things up for newbies is important and unglamorous.

  2. 26th January, 2015 at 19:54 pm

    Hey, I just wanted to say thanks for your posts about example improvements. I submitted my first R bug report on Friday—a minor improvement in the stl documentation—and it was accepted over the weekend. Never would have done that before reading your blog!

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